A Day in the Life of a Veterinary Neurologist
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A Day in the Life of a Veterinary Neurologist


This lecture has been RACE Approved for 2 CE hours for veterinarians and veterinary technicians. This lecture (2 hours) will cover making a correct anatomic diagnosis based on the neurologic exam findings and then developing Read More

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Course Details

This lecture has been RACE Approved for 2 CE hours for veterinarians and veterinary technicians.

This lecture (2 hours) will cover making a correct anatomic diagnosis based on the neurologic exam findings and then developing a plan to discover the correct diagnosis in a systemic manner. Videos of the patient, imaging and other ancillary procedures will be covered in the lectures. Objective: The objective of this lecture is to give the veterinary professional an understanding of the importance of performing a thorough neurologic examination. This exam will then be the foundation to make the correct anatomic diagnosis. Once an anatomic diagnosis is made, the appropriate ancillary procedures and treatment options, if suitable, can be determined and provided to the patient and owner. A basic understanding of neuroanatomy is paramount to providing the best outcome in our veterinary patients with neurologic diseases. During the course of this lecture a review of the pertinent neuroanatomy will be provided based on clinical examples. This includes a discussion of some classic disorders of the brain, spinal cord and neuromuscular system. Examples will be utilized that allow the clinician to distinguish and gain a basic understanding of the neuroanatomy of the veterinary patient. The primary focus of the lecture will be to correlate the clinical exam findings with the associated effects on the nervous system and how to come up with a correct anatomic diagnosis. In the course of the lecture specific suggestions for treatment will be offered. This includes the most up to date options available to our veterinary patients with complex disorders of the nervous system. Additionally, the examples will provide the veterinarian with specific reasonable expectations of outcome with certain neurologic disorders.